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Fishing Hook Size Chart: Choosing the Right Fishing Hook

Fishing Hook Size Chart: Choosing the Right Fishing Hook

Introduction: Why can’t you find a simple Fishing hooks size chart on Google?

Producing a table of all the sizes of hooks for fish wherever they are is a crazy task, because the amount of variables is almost infinite … The size of the hook varies according to the method of fishing, the type of bait, the type of fish, and of course the size of the fish you are trying to catch. This is why most of the articles on the subject remain very general or focus on a specific niche. So we decided to take up the gauntlet and try to give you what you are looking for – a full fishing hooks size chart. We’ll continue to improve it all the time by adding techniques, types of baits and more to make it more and more accurate and usefull. 

How to use our Fishing hooks size chart?

Because the table is so wide and comprehensive, we decided to set it up as a “store”, select the product (the fish), and from there proceed to the specific hook size chart you need.

Fishing Hook Size Chart: Choosing the Right Fishing Hook

The fishing hook size chart is a valuable tool for anglers to use when choosing the right type of bait and fishing hooks. This guide will help you find out what type of fishing hook size you should use, which bait to select, how big or small your fish can be, and more!

Fishing hook sizes

There are many different types of fishing hooks available on the market. The following guide details each size and type, along with recommended species for which it is best suited.

The fishing hook anatomy

Fishing hook parts
Fishing hook parts

The basic terms you need to know about a fishing hook are the shank, point, barb, and eye.

The shank is the long, straight part of a fishing hook. It runs from the gap (the cut-out area between the point and shank) to close to where it meets with the eye at its end. The length and thickness of a fishing hook’s shank determine how large or small your bait can be; longer hooks have larger eyes and can hold more or bigger bait.

The point is the most important part of a fishing hook, as this is where your hook will penetrate your target’s mouth when you’re attempting to catch fish. It’s also what determines whether it’ll be easy for an angler to remove the caught fish from the water or not. A good fishing hook point is one that’s sharp, thin, and sturdy.

The barb is a small projection from the bottom of the shank which prevents your bait from being removed by any predator once it has been hooked on to them. The bigger its diameter, the better protection you get against losing your catch during an intense fight with a fish or a predator.

The eye is the end of a fishing hook that attaches to your line or lure, and it’s usually made from stainless steel. The way an angler ties their knots also determines the strength and ability of a fishing hook to hold on securely throughout your entire trip out in nature’s wilds.

In summary:

Shank=long, straight part of a fishing hook.

Point=the most important part of a fishing hook.

Barb=a small projection from the bottom of the shank which prevents your bait from being removed by any predator once it has been hooked on to them.

Eye=the end of a fishing hook that attaches to your line.

What do fish hook sizes mean?

Hook size is a number that shows the gap between its shank and point, measured in inches or millimeters. The size of a hook is important in determining what kind of fish it can catch, as well as how big your bait should be when you’re fishing for specific species.

A general rule to follow when choosing the right fishing hook size:

  • if you’re fishing for a big fish, use bigger hooks
  • the smaller your bait is, the more likely it will be that even tiny predators can get their mouths on to your hook. So make sure you have a small enough tackle when catching minnows and other similar species.

How do you size a fishing hook?

Fishing hooks sizes are measured on a scale of #32 to #1, and from 1/0 to 19/0 (/0 is called aught). The # hooks are the smaller hook where #32 is the smallest and #1 is the biggest and for the /0 hooks, the bigger the number the bigger the hook.

How do you know what size fishing hook to use?

There are many fishing hook size charts that provide guidelines for choosing the right type of fishing hook, but it’s best to know what your target species is before you choose.

If you’re not sure whether a #18 or 2/0 will work better on your next trip out in nature’s wilds, use this general rule of thumb:

  • When fishing for relatively small species, you should look at the left side of the scale – #12 – #6
  • When fishing for big species (Bass, Catfish, etc.), you should look for the right side of the scale – 2/0 – 6/0

 

Fishing hook size chart in mm \ inches

The chart below shows hooks’ sizes from #12 to 10/0, which are the most popular for freshwater fishing. You rarely need smaller than #12 or bigger from 10/0.

Size

Length (mm)

Gap (mm)

Length (inches)

Gap (inches)

#129mm3mm0.35″0.118″
#1110mm4mm0.39″0.157″
#1011mm5mm0.43″0.196″
#912mm6mm0.47″0.236″
#813mm7mm0.51″0.27″
#714mm8mm0.55″0.31″
#615mm9mm0.59″0.35″
#516mm11mm0.63″0.43″
#417mm12mm0.67″0.47″
#320mm13mm0.78″0.51″
#222mm14mm0.86″0.55″
#125mm15mm0.98″”0.59″”
1/034mm16mm1.33″0.63″
2/039mm17mm1.53″0.67″
3/042mm18mm1.65″0.70″
4/047mm19mm1.85″0.74″
5/052mm21mm2.04″0.82″
6/059mm23mm2.32″0.90″
7/065mm25mm2.56″0.98″
8/072mm28mm2.83″1.10″
9/078mm31mm3.07″1.22″
10/090mm37mm3.54″1.45″

Fishing hook size chart in mm \ inches

The chart below shows hooks’ sizes from #12 to 10/0, which are the most popular for freshwater fishing. You rarely need smaller than #12 or bigger from 10/0.
Size Length mm Gap mm
#12 9mm 3mm
#11 10mm 4mm
#10 11mm 5mm
#9 12mm 6mm
#8 13mm 7mm
#7 14mm 8mm
#6 15mm 9mm
#5 16mm 11mm
#4 17mm 12mm
#3 20mm 13mm
#2 22mm 14mm
#1 25mm 15mm
1/0 34mm 16mm
2/0 39mm 17mm
3/0 42mm 18mm
4/0 47mm 19mm
5/0 52mm 21mm
6/0 59mm 23mm
7/0 65mm 25mm
8/0 72mm 28mm
9/0 78mm 31mm
10/0 90mm 37mm
 
Size Length inches Gap inches
#12 0.35″ 0.118″
#11 0.39″ 0.157″
#10 0.43″ 0.196″
#9 0.47″ 0.236″
#8 0.51″ 0.27″
#7 0.55″ 0.31″
#6 0.59″ 0.35″
#5 0.63″ 0.43″
#4 0.67″ 0.47″
#3 0.78″ 0.51″
#2 0.86″ 0.55″
#1 0.98″” 0.59″”
1/0 1.33″ 0.63″
2/0 1.53″ 0.67″
3/0 1.65″ 0.70″
4/0 1.85″ 0.74″
5/0 2.04″ 0.82″
6/0 2.32″ 0.90″
7/0 2.56″ 0.98″
8/0 2.83″ 1.10″
9/0 3.07″ 1.22″
10/0 3.54″ 1.45″

Common types of fishing hooks

Here is a list of the common types of fishing hooks that are used in modern-day sport:

J - shaped hook

fishing j hook

J hooks are a popular style of hook that has two pointed ends on both the top and bottom. It’s usually best for catching freshwater fish like trout, bass, or perch because it can keep your bait more stable during its trip out into nature’s wilds.

 

Best for catching fish like Trout, Bass, and Perch

Circle hook

fishing Circle hook

Circle hooks are circle-shaped fishing hooks that make it easier to catch fish like cod, red snapper, or grouper because they get hooked in the corner of their mouths instead of right on their jawline. They’re getting more and more popular with anglers every year due to numerous benefits for both fishers and the fish.

 

Best for catching fish like tuna or marlin.

Barbless hook

Gamakatsu Red Barbless Octopus Hook

Barbless hooks are fishing hooks that don’t have any barbs, which makes it easier for you to unhook your catch without hurting them or putting their lives in danger. They’re also safer to use because they can only hook the target species once and won’t get caught up on rocks or other hard surfaces.

 

Best for catching fish like panfish, bluegill, or perch

Extra-wide gap hook

Fishing Extra-wide gap hook

Wide gap hooks are fishing hooks that have a much wider gape between their shank and point compared to other hook types, which makes it easier for you to catch a larger variety of fish species. They’re best when using live bait like worms or leeches because they’ll be able to hold on to the bait without falling off.

 

Best for catching fish like catfish, pike, or muskie.

Treble hook

Fishing Treble hook

Treble hooks are fishing hooks that come in threes, with each hook coming off of the shank at different angles to make it harder for your catch to escape once they’ve been hooked on them. Treble hooks are best when catching fish like trout or bass because their mouths aren’t as strong and powerful compared to saltwater fish, or when you use snagging technique.

 

Best for catching fish like trout, bass, walleye, perch, catfish

Barb hook

barbed fishing hook

Barbed hooks are single hooks that have two or three small barbs on their shank, which help them to get caught in the roof of your target’s mouth instead of falling out when it bites down onto one end. They’re usually best for catching saltwater species like snappers and groupers because they’ve got much stronger jaws than freshwater fish.

 

Best for catching fish like Snappers, Groupers.

Needlepoint hooks

Needlepoint Fishing hooks

Needlepoint hooks are single fishing hooks that have very sharp points, which make them ideal for catching species like carp and tuna that can put up a fight on the end of your line. They’re also great when using live bait because they’ll hold onto it more securely until you get a bite.

 

Best for catching fish like carp, tuna.

Offset hooks

Offset Fishing hooks

Offset hooks are fishing hooks that have their point facing outwards, which makes it easier for you to catch freshwater fish because they can’t get snagged on the rocks or other hard surfaces when you’re trying to reel them in. They come in different shapes and styles, but all of them will help with the same purpose: to make it easier for you to catch your catch.

 

Best for catching fish like trout, bass.

Spinners

Spinner Fishing hooks

Spinners are fishing hooks that have a small spinner on the end of their shank, which is designed to spin when they’re in action so that fish can’t see them coming until it’s too late for them to escape. They’re best for catching freshwater fish because they can’t bite and get stuck to them as easily compared to saltwater species.

 

Best for catching fish like trout, perch.

Jig hooks

Jig fishing hook

Jig hooks are fishing hooks that have a barbed shank, which is designed to hold the bait in place so it stays stable when you’re out on your boat or dock at sea. They’ve got short shanks that are easy to use for all fishing techniques, but they’re best when using worms or leeches because it’ll make it easier for you to hook them in place.

In the end, it’s important that you’re using a fishing hook size chart so that you know exactly what type of hook will work best for each species, as well as knowing how big they are compared to others so that you know how to avoid getting snagged on them.

Best for catching fish like panfish, bluegill, perch.

Aberdeen hook

Aberdeen fishing hook

Aberdeen hooks are single fishing hooks that have a long shank and wide gape, which makes them ideal for catching species like trout. They’re also great when using live bait because they’ll hold onto it more securely until you get a bite.

 

Best for catching fish like trout.

Octopus hook

Octopus Fishing hooks

Octopus hooks are single fishing hooks that have three barbs on the end of the shank instead of just one like a regular barb hook, which helps it to stay in the mouth of your target fish until you get a chance to bring it on board. They’re best for catching freshwater species like perch, catfish, and panfish because the barbs will help them to stay in place after being caught.

 

Best for catching fish like perch, catfish, panfish.

Worm hook

Worm Fishing hooks

Warm hooks are single fishing hooks that have a wide gap and long shank, which is designed for catching species like tuna. They’re best when using live bait because it’ll make it easier for you to hook them in place once they’ve taken the bait from your hand.

 

Best for catching fish like tuna.

Baitholder hook

Baitholder fishing hook

Baitholder hooks are single fishing hooks that have a wide gap and long shank, which makes it easier for you to catch species like trout. They’re best when using live bait because they’ll hold onto it more securely until you get a bite.

 

Best for catching fish like trout.

Limerick hook

Limerick fishing hook

Limerick hooks are perfect for fishing with natural baits like worms, which makes them ideal for catching species like carp and trout. They’re also great when using live bait because they’ll hold onto it more securely until you get a bite.

 

Best for catching fish like carp, trout.

 

Fly fishing hook

Fly fishing hook

Fly fishing hooks are multiple fishing hooks that have a wide gap and long shank, which makes it easier for you to catch species like trout. They’re best when using live bait because they’ll hold onto it more securely until you get a bite.

 

Best for catching fish like trout.

 

Weedless Hooks

Weedless fishing hook

Weedless hooks make it easier for fishermen to reel in their catches without getting them tangled on weeds, rocks, and other obstacles. They’re best used when fishing in freshwater streams with lots of vegetation because it makes it easier for you to pull your catch up without getting snagged on anything along the way.

 

Best for catching fish like panfish, bluegill, perch.

 

Siwash Hooks

Siwash fishing hook

Siwash hooks are fishing hooks that have no shank, which means they’re great for catching species like trout because the fish’s mouth will be able to close behind them. They’ve got short gape and barbless eyes so you can easily remove them after your catch is on board without hurting yourself, other people in the boat with you, or the fish itself.

 

Best for catching fish like trout.

Kahle Hooks

Kahle fishing hook

Kahle Hooks have a wider gap than most circle hooks and can be fished around thick cover. They’ve got a single palm-sized barb, which makes it difficult for large fish to throw them.

 

Best for catching fish like tuna.

Sproat Hooks

Sproat fishing hook

Sproat hooks have a slightly upturned eye and rounder bend than most circle hooks, which not only helps you hook bigger species but also increases your chances of getting the line back once they’re on board. They’ve got a single palm-sized barb, which means that your catch won’t get away and it’ll be easier for you to handle once you’ve brought them on board.

Best for catching fish like tuna.

 

Fishing hook sizes common questions answered

Here are the most common questions regarding fishing hook sizes:

How do fishing hook sizes work?

A fishing hook size is an indication of how large the gap and shank are. Hooks size ranges from#32 being the smallest to 19/0 being the largest.

How big is a number 8 hook?

A size number eight hook is about one and a half inches in length.

Which hook size is bigger 1 or 2?

A size number 2/0 hook is bigger than a 1/0, while a size #2 is smaller than #1.

How big is a #6 hook?

A #6 is about 15mm in length and 9mm in width.

What is a size 6 hook good for?

A size #6 hook is great for catching fish like tuna, marlin, and mackerel.

What size is a 4 0 fish hook?

A size 4 0 hooks is actually 4/0 and its length is 47mm and its width is 19mm

What size hooks are good for bluegill?

For bluegill, we recommend size #10 to size #6

Which hook is bigger 1 or 0?

There is no 0 size hook, however, when adding /0 to the hook size it means it’ll be bigger than # sizes.

What size hooks for bream fishing?

Only one size is available, which is the ideal #8 Bream Hook.

What size hooks for trout fishing?

In general, sizes #8 to #14 would work best for trout fishing. I recommend it as a good choice for beginners looking to catch fish without spending too much money on the gear.

Check here for our full trout hook size chart

What size hook should I use for largemouth bass?

Largemouth bass prefers medium-sized hooks (1/0-4/0)

Check here for our full Largemouth bass hook size chart

What size hook is best for bass?

The size of a hook depends on the type of bass and the hook type you’re using. For example, For largemouth bass, we recommend 1/0-4/0 circle, seedless, or siwash, while for smallmouth we would go with Aberdeen or octopus sized #6 to 1/0.

Check here for our full smallmouth bass hook size chart

And here for the largemouth bass hook size chart

What size hooks on crankbaits?

A good size treble hook for a crankbait is #2. You can go as small as #8, but I wouldn’t recommend anything bigger than that. The smaller ones are better for shallow water, but you should always go with the size your fish is used to seeing.

What size hooks for crappie?

I recommend the #6 hook for crappie fishing. You can go up to size #2, depending on the crappie size you’re after.

Check here for our full crappie hook size chart

What size hook is on a 6XD?

The size of the hook on a 6XD is #1 or 1/0

What size hooks are on a rattle trap?

The hooks on a rattle trap are typically between #4 and #6. That’s from wide to narrow, so you can see how to get nice action with the baitfish.

What size hook is best for minnows?

The hook size you want for fish depends on the length of the minnow. You can use #4 with short minnows, and up to 1/0 or even 2/0 with large ones.

What size hooks for Nightcrawlers?

I would recommend size #2 – #4 for large nightcrawlers for large trouts like brown trout, while for most trout types I’ll go with size #6 – #8.

 

In Conclusion:

The size of the fishing hook you choose will depend on what kind of fish, weight, and technique you are using. We have provided a chart to help guide your decision.

You may also want to consider purchasing hooks from different manufacturers so that you can use them in saltwater or freshwater if necessary. In addition, it is important not to over-hook a fish because this could cause serious damage to their mouth while fighting with the line during the catch process. If they swallow part of the lure or bait there’s even more danger for an injury which means another dead fish!

So be sure when choosing a hook that fits properly onto your fishing pole before putting any lines out into water anywhere near humans!